water-jet cutting head / 4-axis / 2D / for bevel cutting

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water-jet cutting head / 4-axis / 2D / for bevel cutting water-jet cutting head / 4-axis / 2D / for bevel cutting
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Characteristics

  • Technology:

    water-jet

  • Number of axes:

    4-axis

  • Type:

    2D

  • Applications:

    for bevel cutting

  • Other characteristics:

    adjustable

Description

The water pressure switch can provide quick water shut-off and easy energy efficiency improvement. The high-pressure water goes through the high-pressure pipe into the cutting head connector, then enters the high-precision cutting head body through the ruby nozzle, while the abrasive enters through the abrasive pipe. The mixture of water and abrasive forms a water jet at very high speed of 800 m/s to cut the workpiece.

Features of APW 4-Axis Cutting Head

A-axis angle manual 0/4° tilting cutting system

In the inlay industry, when the tilting angle of the cutting head is 4°, the kerfs section will change a lot. By the compensation of angle during cutting, the cutting kerfs will be a reversed taper. When two pieces of cutting parts are matching together, the top surfaces won't have aperture but the bottom surfaces do. In this way, the twice manual polishing will be saved, which reduces the processing cost and enhances the working efficiency. With this improved 4-axis cutting head design, it is no longer a difficult technique in stone matching. It makes complex traditional stone matching become an easy work. The quality of stone pattern has had a great improvement and solved the technical problem of splicing technology at the same time.

A-axis angle manual 0-45° tilting cutting system

There are two distinct attributes often occur when we are using waterjet: stream lag and taper. Stream lag occurs when the entry point of the waterjet cuts faster than the exit part. This is because the jet is most powerful when entering the material and loses some of its power as it exits. In effect the exit stream is lagging behind the entrance point.